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Monthly Archives: August 2011

Music phrasemakers: Tobi Vail, DJ Lovebug Starski, William Burroughs and Fela Kuti

“Music comes from everywhere, and so do the names we call it by. There’s a longstanding cliche that only the music business needs genre names – everyone else either likes it or they don’t. That is, of course, bunk, as anyone who’s heard enough people trot out lines such as “I like all music except for rap and country” is aware. Not least because quite a lot of those genre names come from the artists themselves.”

 

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/aug/25/origins-of-music-genres-hip-hop

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“It didn’t take long for me to get a taste of the staggering sexism and class bigotry that would make the first season of Roseanne god-awful. It was at the premiere party when I learned that my stories and ideas—and the ideas of my sister and my first husband, Bill—had been stolen. The pilot was screened, and I saw the opening credits for the first time, which included this: CREATED BY MATT WILLIAMS. I was devastated and felt so betrayed that I stood up and left the party. Not one person noticed.”

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http://nymag.com/print/?/arts/tv/upfronts/2011/roseanne-barr-2011-5/

Screened October 2010.

“The scene, which shows scores of Asian children producing animation cells for “The Simpsons” in hyperbolically grim conditions (one child throws kittens into a shredding machine to produce stuffing for Bart dolls, while another seals boxes of the dolls with a decapitated dolphin head tape dispenser) mocks the means of production behind the show’s own making; much of the animation done for the show has been produced by various companies in South Korea, including AKOM and Sunwoo Entertainment’s Anivision Studios. The sequence is puzzling, as it portrays both Rupert Murdoch‘s 20th Century Fox Studios as well as the creators of the show itself in an unflattering light, although the show hasn’t been afraid of taking swipes at its parent company’s owner in the past.”

Continue reading:

http://blogs.wsj.com/speakeasy/2010/10/11/banksy-directs-subversive-simpsons-introduction-sequence/

“Such antagonism goads people, as it is designed to. For a while, the Wikipedia entry for Banksy began, “Banksy is a nancy boy. Banksy is a rip-off. Banksy is a bloody sod.” Diane Shakespeare, an official with the Keep Britain Tidy campaign, told me, “We are concerned that Banksy’s street art glorifies what is essentially vandalism,” while Jonathan Jones, of the Guardian, recently wrote on his blog, “I think there’s some wit in Banksy’s work, some cleverness—and a massive bucket of hot steaming hype.” But for every litter freak or culture purist driven to indignation by Banksy there’s a person who is entranced. While setting up the show in Los Angeles, Banksy ordered a pizza, ate it, and tossed the box in a Dumpster. Within weeks, the pizza box was sold on eBay, for a hundred and two dollars. The seller suggested that a few anchovies that had been left inside might yield traces of Banksy’s DNA.

 

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http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/05/14/070514fa_fact_collins?currentPage=all

The fall issue of The New York Times Style Magazine, has an article on what young people are wearing in the streets of London, Cairo and Tokyo. The fashion displays are both surprising — Barbour jackets are cool in London! — and not unexpected — Egyptian flags everywhere in Cairo. As we scan the photos in fashion magazines and click on to blogs that chronicle the latest trends, we can’t help but wonder: How has globalization affected street style?

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http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/08/21/has-globalization-ruined-street-style?ref=opinion

“There is a middle way; think of it as the moment of perfect overlap at twilight. He said, “If we can make it profitable to use the common language of film, a language that addresses­ a public, to say something worth saying that was previously unsaid or unsayable, then those things get said.” That such movies have to turn a profit in order to exist, a condition of truly public utterance in a capitalist society, just adds another element to the puzzle, one more rule to the game.”

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http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/28/magazine/28Schamus-t.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss&pagewanted=all